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Why a Wiki?

Have you ever had a question that you're sure somebody knows the answer to, but don't know who knows it or how to get ahold of them? The GraceWiki has been created to allow people to write down what they know in a way that other people can learn it when they need to know it. The search feature allows people to find information quickly. The history feature allows people to know who made a particular change to the wiki.

Hey, that needs to say this...

The great thing about a Wiki is that it is relatively quick and easy to edit, which allows more people to contribute to it. If you see something that is incorrect or incomplete, just log-in, click the edit button, make your change and then click save. If you goof something up, it can be reverted or fixed later.

Editing refers to the changing of a page by a GraceWiki user. While everyone can view the contents of GraceWiki, you must first log on in order to edit the content. This is a brief overview of that process. While it is possible to get quite fancy in creating articles, it usually isn't necessary. It is far better to have complete and accurate information than it is to have it all look pretty. If you get the information into the Wiki, someone else can "clean it up" and make it pretty.

What shouldn't be on the wiki

Since GraceWiki is visible to everyone, there are some things that don't belong on it.

It is not a place for:

  • controversial subjects that Grace does not have an official policy on.
  • a place to publish speculation, or 'in-process' discussions
  • passwords, account numbers or any confidential information
  • anything that we would be embarrassed about if it showed up on the front page of the Gazette-Times
  • anything that is copyrighted

Logging On

You can access the GraceWiki by adding /wiki to the end of the Grace web page address. It should look like this: http://grace97330.org/wiki

To log on, click on the words "Log in" in the top right corner of the page. It will ask for your name and password. Both the name and the password are case sensitive, so be careful to type it correctly. We are creating accounts using the first and last names of the user. This makes it easy to tell who made a particular change to the content.

Most frequent Wiki markup explained

Here are the most frequently used types of wiki markup.

What it looks like What you type

You can italicize text by putting 2 apostrophes on each side.

3 apostrophes will embolden the text.

5 apostrophes will embolden and italicize the text.

(4 apostrophes don't do anything special -- there's just 'one left over'.)

You can ''italicize text'' by putting 2 
apostrophes on each side. 

3 apostrophes will embolden '''the text'''. 

5 apostrophes will embolden and italicize 
'''''the text'''''.

(4 apostrophes don't do anything
special -- there's just ''''one left
over''''.)
Section headings

Headings organize your writing into sections. The Wiki software can automatically generate a table of contents from them.

Subsection

Using more equals signs creates a subsection.

A smaller subsection

Don't skip levels, like from two to four equals signs.

Start with 2 equals signs not 1 because 1 creates H1 tags which should be reserved for page title.

== Section headings ==

''Headings'' organize your writing into sections.
The Wiki software can automatically generate
a table of contents from them.

=== Subsection ===

Using more equals signs creates a subsection.

==== A smaller subsection ====
Don't skip levels, 
like from two to four equals signs.

Start with 2 equals signs not 1 
because 1 creates H1 tags
which should be reserved for page title.
  • Unordered lists are easy to do:
    • Start every line with a star.
      • More stars indicate a deeper level.
  • Previous item continues.
    • A new line
  • in a list

marks the end of the list.

  • Of course you can start again.
* ''Unordered lists'' are easy to do:
** Start every line with a star.
*** More stars indicate a deeper level.
* Previous item continues.
** A new line
* in a list  
marks the end of the list.
* Of course you can start again.
  1. Numbered lists are:
    1. Very organized
    2. Easy to follow
  2. Previous item continues

A new line marks the end of the list.

  1. New numbering starts with 1.
# ''Numbered lists'' are:
## Very organized
## Easy to follow
# Previous item continues
A new line marks the end of the list.
# New numbering starts with 1.
A colon (:) indents a line or paragraph.

A newline starts a new paragraph.
Often used for discussion on talk pages.

We use 1 colon to indent once.
We use 2 colons to indent twice.
3 colons to indent 3 times, and so on.
: A colon (:) indents a line or paragraph.
A newline starts a new paragraph. <br>
Often used for discussion on talk pages.
: We use 1 colon to indent once.
:: We use 2 colons to indent twice.
::: 3 colons to indent 3 times, and so on.


Here's a link to the Main Page.

But be careful - capitalization counts!

Here's a link to the [[Main page]].

Intentionally permanent red link is a page that doesn't exist yet. You could create it by clicking on the link.

[[Intentionally permanent red link]] is 
a page that doesn't exist
yet. You could create it by 
clicking on the link.
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